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TYPES OF INSULIN

 

Disclaimer - This content has been created for information purposes only, please consult your doctor before taking any decision on diabetes management. Although great care has been taken in compiling and checking the information, Johnson and Johnson Ltd., and its associates shall not be responsible, or in any way liable for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies in this publication whether arising from negligence or otherwise however, or for any consequence arising there from.

WHAT ARE DIFFERENT KINDS OF INSULIN AND HOW THEY WORK?

Some types of insulin act quickly to match the rise in blood glucose after a meal. Other types act more slowly to control blood glucose throughout the night and day. Your doctor will prescribe the insulin that is best for you.

  • A basal insulin dose provides long-lasting control of overnight and fasting (morning) glucose levels.
  • Bolus doses provide control of more immediate rises in glucose levels. For example, to cover meals.
  • A late-day basal insulin injection is a common first step in insulin therapy. Throughout the day your body may still be able to keep your blood glucose under control with or without diabetes pills. But you may need a basal insulin injection to help keep your glucose steady throughout the night.
  • A pre-mixed insulin is a combination of a basal insulin and a fast-acting insulin that offers the convenience of both precise and consistent dosing.

Basal insulin

Insulin type - BASAL

When it starts working

When it works at peak

How long it lasts

Long-acting Usually taken at bedtime to control glucose while you sleep

3-4 Hours

8-15 Hours

22-26 Hours

Intermediate acting Usually taken in the morning to work all day

1-3 Hours

5-8 Hours

Up to 18 Hours


When to self-monitor your blood glucose

Insulin type - BASAL

When to self-monitor blood glucose

Long-acting Usually taken at bedtime to control glucose while you sleep

Before injecting, to see if your glucose is in the Diabetes Safe Zone

Before breakfast, to see if your insulin dose works to keep you in the Diabetes Safe Zone throughout the night

Around 3 a.m. if your fasting results are high or low

Intermediate acting Usually taken at bedtime to control glucose while you sleep or in the morning before breakfast

Before injecting, to see if your glucose is in the Diabetes Safe Zone

Before breakfast, to see if your insulin dose works to keep you in the Diabetes Safe Zone throughout the night

Before bed, to see if you need a snack so your glucose doesn't fall too low during the night



Bolus insulin

Insulin type - BOLUS

When it starts working

When it works at peak

How long it lasts

Short-acting Sometimes used around mealtimes, it is taken 30 to 45 mins. before eating. Therefore, timing of meals is important

30-60 Minutes

2-4 Hours

5-8 Hours

Rapid acting Injected right before meals. By the time food is digested and glucose is moving into the bloodstream, rapid-acting insulin is working hard to move glucose into the cells.

10-15 Minutes

60-90 Minutes

4-5 Hours


When to self-monitor your blood glucose

Insulin type - BOLUS

When to self-monitor blood glucose

Short-acting Sometimes used around mealtimes, it is taken 30 to 45 mins. before eating. Therefore, timing of meals is important

Before injecting, to see if your glucose is in the Diabetes Safe Zone and to help you plan your meal content and insulin dosage

2 hours after meals, to check the effect of your insulin dose

Before bed, to see if you need a snack so your glucose doesn't fall too low during the night

Rapid acting Injected right before meals. By the time food is digested and glucose is moving into the bloodstream, rapid-acting insulin is working hard to move glucose into the cells

Before injecting, to help determine your insulin dose and to help you plan your meal content

2 hours after eating, to check the effect of the insulin dose

Before bed, to see if you need a snack so your glucose doesn't fall too low during the night


Pre-mixed insulin

Pre-mixed insulin is a combination of basal insulin and fast-acting insulin that offers the convenience of fixed precise and consistent dosing. This may work well in some patients. Its timing of administration, when it starts working, when it works at peak, and duration of effect depends on the combination. See characteristics of basal insulin and bolus insulin.

When to self-monitor your blood glucose

Timing of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) depends on the combination of basal insulin and bolus insulin. See characteristics of basal insulin and bolus insulin.

How would you find if you’re insulin plan is working well?

Follow these basic steps to find out how well your insulin plan is working:

Types Of Insulin